Brat

Originally posted on BooksGoSocial:

BratThe sound of playing cards rhythmically slapping against bicycle spokes echoed down the poorly paved road. Dusk settled gently,summoning neighborhood streetlights to begin their flickeringbeam dance.

Moisture laden air pasted Belamie’s bangs against herforehead. Her light cotton tank top cringed against dampglistening skin, an occasional faint breeze shifting wisps of longlight brown hair across her shoulders. With a firm grip on theturned up handlebars, Belamie effortlessly steered the stolen bike.

Placing her left hand behind her she twisted around, checking onher best friend peddling methodically behind.Sari seemed as if she just stepped down from pages of aglamour magazine, even eloquently supporting a heavy whiteplaster cast, resulting from bunion surgery in late April. Thehospital casing surrounded her in certain fame, enveloping aroundher as a fairytale. Every inch of plaster from toes to kneecapsshared heartfelt wishes, funny drawings to make her laugh andphone numbers by the dozen.

Belamie’s homespun “girl-next-door” cuteness, as…

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Sand stamina… Nick and I  share half of what the boy has. He trudges without us  to the top of the highest dune, sledding back down while we watch, drinking cold bottled water.

 The ride fills him with adrenalin. Wanting more, he races past us to the edge of the dune we stand on.  

Dune Sledding

Cloud Riding to The Great Sand Dunes

I am cloud gazing, Nick is singing to Boston on the radio and the Boy is sleeping in the backseat.
We are on our way to one of the most amazing places in the world.

Best surprise of all, the Boy will be sand sledding  the Star Dune, 750 feet straight down.

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Preparing for a Death

Mom went into Hospice care, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s  claiming completeness  of her body and mind.  My beautiful mother is a shell, unable to eat because simple acts of chewing or swallowing have been crippled.   Her movements are seldom, her rapid weight loss shocking .

I pray I don’t remember her this way, diving into more pleasant thoughts of a vibrant, loving, fun, truly the most kindest human being I have ever known.

I pray God in his divine mercy takes her swiftly to be with ones who wait patiently for her arrival.

I pray my family will be strong.

I pray she is in no pain as she is unable to speak or show emotion.

I pray I was a good daughter and that she knows how much I love her.

Falling Down

I did not see God but I am pretty sure I died the eve before our Halloween party in 2010. The weather comfortably warm for October, invited me to enjoy the late evening hour on our porch.  The decorations surpassed spooky greatness of years past and I sipped my wine, enjoying my accomplishments.

A light breeze showed the large spider web in the corner breaking off at center, prompting me to stand on one of the plastic chairs to fix it.

I opened my eyes blinking, not knowing where I was, pretty sure I laid in my bed next to my husband. But I peered at my driveway still not grasping what had happened. I wasn’t cold, but rather comfortable until I tried to move my legs. Laying on my right side, I took in the night, realising I was not in my warm bedroom, I began to panick. Lifting my head, dried blood held my hair to the cement.

It took about fifteen minutes before I became mobile, my body numb I began to slowly crawl up the steps to the front door. Funny, my thoughts at this time, not wanting to bleed all over my entrance way, holding my face, the blood collecting in the palms of my hands.

Standing in front of the bathroom mirror, my reflection deemed brutal. In shock, I believed I could wash the ugliness away, my nose would heal from the wide bleeding gash. The more I wiped the blood away, the more it poured down my face. I calmly walked into my bedroom where my husband slept.

“Whats wrong? Are you ok?”
“I’m fine.” And I crawled into bed.
“You don’t sound fine” His voice concerned, made me turn away in embarrassment.

I lay there for a few seconds before blood engulfed my pillow. “Honey, I fell and I think we need to go to the hospital”

I look back and know that I passed. I didn’t see Angels or Jesus, all I know I was not afraid, I was calm, the peace inviting. It wasn’t my time and I didn’t even break any of my teeth. Although my face took many months to heal, I feel a calmness knowing death is not to be feared and I will never be afraid to die. There is a place to go.